Importance of Security in Small Business

Weak LinkNo business is too small to implement good basic information security practices. Small businesses are linked to other small and larger businesses.  They provide an immediate source of soft targets, and can even stream an attacker into the supply chain.

Like the Infographic at B2C shows, threats lurk around every corner, endangering the survival of small businesses. B2C also provides some startling statistics related to the attitude of small  businesses towards information security.

  • 24.6 million small businesses in the US.
    • 25% do not shred their documents.
    • 27% have never completed an information security risk assessment.
    • 36% have no policies for  storage or disposal.
    • 31% have never trained employees regarding the importance of information  security.
  • There are 2.3 million small businesses across Canada.
    • 47% believe a security breach would not impact their business.
    • 28% are not aware of legal compliance and legislation issues that apply to their business.
    • 35% don’t have a protocol for storage and disposal of confidential  data.
    • 56% don’t have a secure method of document disposal.

Is it any wonder why so many small businesses fail, and we have so many issues with security?

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Marshall Law – Gary Marshall That Is…

Sorry Gary, could not resist the subject line.  I came across this excellent US based blog by Gary Marshall out of Seattle Washington and thought I would share it. 

GaryGary enjoys working with creative people, including entrepreneurs, small business owners, people who create new technology, and artists. He brings over 25 years of experience in business and technology law and litigation, including computer law, Internet law, and art law together in one practice.

On his blog, Gary offers some excellent advice, as well as additional links for entrepreneurs and small business owners to peruse, putting out some excellent thinking and discussion fodder.  As the father figure of a couple of entrepreneurs, I hope they take the time to read Gary’s suggestions and advice, and sit down with their business partners to ensure that they have covered all of the bases.

Like Gary says, the time to deal with the real thorny issues, the ones that you would rather not touch or that could have a serious impact on how you do business are the ones that you REALLY need to tackle while you are good friends and business partners.  Not after things have deteriorated and bad feelings have slipped into the equation.

http://marshall2law.com/