Sophos 2011 Security Threat Report

Sophos’ threat experts see 30,000 new malicious URLs each day.

70% of these sites are legitimate websites that have been compromised.

Their 2011 Security Threat Report has been released detailing the battle against malware.

It describes the significant threats of 2010, what to watch for in 2011, and more importantly, what you need to do to get ahead of the threats.

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  • One of the more persistent threats of the year was fake anti-virus, also commonly known as “scareware” or “rogueware.”  In this widespread practice, software is introduced into a victim’s computer system, through an interface closely resembling—and in some cases directly impersonating—genuine security solutions.   Criminals are using this ploy to drain bank accounts and completely take over identities.
  • The search engine is our gateway to the web, and crooks are skilled at manipulating search results from the popular engines such as Google, Bing and Yahoo! to lure victims to their malicious pages.   These pages host security risks and browser exploits just waiting to infect users who are directed to these sites. There’s also the abuse of legitimate search engine optimization (SEO) techniques. Legitimate SEO techniques are regularly used as marketing tools, but when SEO is abused by the bad guys, and supplemented by more devious methods, it’s known as “SEO poisoning”. With SEO poisoning, search engine results are poisoned to drive user traffic to the rogue site.  Google reported that up to 1.3% of their search results are infected . You’re directed to a bad page through a poisoned search.  Once a victim is lured to the desired webpage, they’re redirected to a rogue or compromised site.  On these sites, criminals infect users’ machines with malware or push fake goods and service while attempting to steal personal information.
  • Facebook recorded half a billion active users, making it not only the largest social networking site, but also one of the most popular destinations on the web.  Young people are less likely to use email, and more apt to communicate through Facebook, Twitter or other social sites.  Unsurprisingly, scammers and malware purveyors targeted this massive and committed user base , with diverse and steadily growing of attacks throughout 2010.  One of the more common types of attack hitting Facebook users is “clickjacking,”.  These attacks use maliciously created pages where the true function of a button is concealed beneath an opaque layer showing something entirely different.  Often sharing or “liking” the content in question sends the attack out to contacts through newsfeeds and status updates, propagating the scam.

Other areas that are assessed and reported on are passwords, and spam.  It’s a good report, well worth the read.

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